Tag Archives: organic growing

Growing Enthusiasm For Home Grown Food

It’s been a long time since I posted here. I’ve kept promising you more and then my health has let me down and I’ve had to stop. But now, following a proper diagnosis and major surgery, I feel I can start again. I’m improving by the day. So after a very long period where I haven’t been able to do anything related to gardening or anything else much, I’m back. This weekend was spent at a Master Gardener’s induction course. Master Gardeners are a group of volunteers who pass their gardening skills on to those wishing to grow their own food. If you are interested in what they do you can find them at http://mastergardeners.org.uk/ So my enthusiasm has returned. I came home from the course and sowed macro greens. Fenugreek, pea shoots and green lentils have started the ball rolling, and today in the greenhouse I’ve sown spring onions, Kohl rabi, dwarf French beans, parsley, basil, coriander, red lettuce and garlic chives. The idea is to fill my front garden with pots of herbs and other edibles to demonstrate how easy it is to grow food even in a small space. My house happens to be on a very busy main road and opposite a corner shop, so people stop outside my place for the shop, and lots will see what I’m up to. I hope to inspire others to grow food.

Pea shoots are new to me. And what a revelation! They taste so strongly of peas. Delicious and such and easy thing to grow on the windowsill even in winter. Take one pot, paper or plastic cup, add compost and plenty of marrow fat peas, water and stand back for a couple of weeks. Then presto, fresh pea shoots for your salads. Yet something you pay a premium for at the supermarket restaurant. Who needs plastic packed veg when you can pick them so fresh and so cheaply? Marrow fat peas are about 80p for 500g and one packet used in this way will last you for ages! Far cheaper than buying peas grown to sow. In fact, when sowing seeds to eat as macro greens, packeted veg seeds often are coated with fungicides etc so it’s best to use supermarket edibles, like the marrow fats, fenugreek and coriander, or buy organically prepared seeds.

In the meantime, here are some photos of the garden today, including my overwintered Japanese onions which sadly are showing signs of onion rot, so although these are useable they are small and I won’t be able to grow onions again. Garlic will have to be consigned to pots. I can’t do without garlic!

Crocus in Flower last month

onions

chives in full flower

alpine trough

border by the patio

aquelegia

border by the greenhouse

lupins in their second year from seed

aquelegia

Stunning Iris

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My Mega Trip And Progress

It’s been a while since I posted here and for very good reasons. I told you I was going away to see some old friends, and on the lookout for new ideas. The trip started out just fine, going down to Chippenham in Wiltshire, where one of my oldest friends now lives. He’s partially sighted and works with the parks and gardens department there. He took me around his place of work, a beautiful park with the river Avon running through it. My dog, Daisy was thrilled, as every time we walked into town we had to cross the park, throwing her ball all the way. He lives so close I could easily take her there for more exercise. There were some interesting sculptures in the park, one inscribed by local children. I like ornamentation in the garden, especially if it can include a smile or a scream, as you’ll see from my earlier posts. Chippenham is an ancient town, and on one of the walls I spotted some ferns, proving that plants are opportunists and will grow wherever they can.

Ferns growing in an old wall

Ferns growing in an old wall

I then moved a bit further on and visited someone in Warminster, a military town. My friend there has a new allotment, where I went to see what she was up to, and ended up spending some time helping her thin out her overgrown tomatoes. Outside she grows her vegetables alongside flowers, promoting a healthier balance and keeping the pests at bay, as she’s bringing in the pollinators and the pest controllers.

Lettuce and marigolds

Lettuce and marigolds

 

She had a lovely garden, too, complete with a Buddah. It was a very tranquil space, with wind chimes, but not the high pitched twinkly type. The low, resonating sound was very calming and peaceful.

Buddha

Buddha

Unfortunately, while I was there, just after taking this shot, I dropped my camera. It broke the UV filter, but that saved my lens! The nearest place to get a replacement filter happened to be Taunton, on my way down to Oakhampton. The shop was very friendly and I soon had my replacement filter. Then the problems started. There were road works. It was a hot day. I got stuck in a huge traffic jam lasting for hours. So tired and hot, by the time I got off the motorway, I didn’t realise it, but I was getting confused. And lost. A two hour journey turned out to take ten. And while looking for my directions, leaning over the back seat whilst parked in the wrong village eight miles away, I broke two ribs. I can’t tell you how scary that was at ten o’clock at night, alone and in the dark on the edge of Dartmoor.

Anyway, to cut a long story as short as possible, I eventually made it to my friends. I proved I can still cut it independently. And this is what I woke up to the following morning.

Village pond

Village pond

I watched wrens flitting around in the climbers at the back of the pond, only feet away. They wouldn’t see me. The camper makes a great hide. I tried to get photos, but my sore ribs prevented me from getting into the right position and staying still.

Church Cottage

Church Cottage

I didn’t see as much as I would have liked of my friend or the area, as I had to cut my visit short and make my way home to recover. He grows peaches on his smallholding, keeps a rare breed of sheep and has a wonderful tepee on the land. His philosophy is the same as mine – as carbon neutral and organic as humanly possible. He’s trying forest style gardening for the first time, and I’ve asked him to keep me abreast of developments. Not many photos, I’m afraid. Walking Daisy was painful, and carrying camera equipment impossible, but I’ve included one photo of the pond on my ‘doorstep’ and of my friend’s lovely home, an ancient church cottage. With a spiral staircase and lovely deep, rib soaking bath!

My trip turned out to be one of 700 miles. It’s a shame I couldn’t see more of Dartmoor, of the gardens in the area and take more photos, but certainly showed me I’m more capable of coping alone than I thought I was. My ribs are beginning to mend, though all this only happened 2 ½ weeks ago. So I’m only just starting to do things in the garden again, starting with the blight ridden tomato removal and taking off the shading ready for winter crops. The greenhouse is getting a very thorough clean, slowly, and someone else is doing any heavy lifting, but gingerly I’m getting on with it as I want my winter salads, such as lettuce and spring onions. More next time…..