Monthly Archives: August 2013

Come And See Me On Pinterest

I’d like to share some more of my ideas and interests with you than I could possibly post here on WordPress, and I’ve discovered Pinterest. I’ve gathered together some lovely ideas, inspiration and information there, so if you want to see more, explore my Pinterest interests, please join me there.

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What A Beauty!

Magpie Moth

Magpie Moth

I posted a couple of days ago my astonishment at finding lots of moths visiting my flowers at dusk, and assumed that until I could set up a trap  I wouldn’t get  a chance to photograph them and show you how gorgeous some of them are. Well I was wrong. Throwing the ball for Daisy this afternoon, I spotted this flitting into the grass. A Magpie moth. How stunning! Apparently, according to my book, they do sometime fly during the day, and here’s the proof. Moths can be beautiful, just like their daytime counterparts that we call butterflies.

Have you spotted any in your garden? What could you do to invite them in?

Moths – The Night Economy Butterflies Visit In Droves

Moth On Bergamot. Taken with flash

Moth On Bergamot. Taken with flash

Yesterday I went into the garden at dusk. I was greeted by a sight I’ve never seen before. Moths. In their droves. They were drawn by the bergamot, a herb I planted for the bees and myself. It’s a beautifully scented flower used to flavour Earl Grey tea. They don’t rest on the flowers like our daytime butterflies, but hover and feed on the wing. At least, those I could see were doing just that. I managed to get a photo using flash, but of course it’s not perfect, but does demonstrate their behavior nicely. You can actually see its proboscis delving into the flower for its pollen. I was overjoyed!

All our insects are suffering drops in numbers, including our moths. There is no difference between butterflies and moths, except their day/nighttime habits in this world, and they are pollinators of many flowers. They are another part of our eco-system suffering habitat and food plant loss and need our conservation efforts as much as a daytime butterfly or bee.

Once I’d spotted a species on the bergamot I started peering around to see of they were visiting any other flowers. Indeed they were. The buddlia was busy with them, as was the honeysuckle and dahlias. So when you feed the bees and the butterflies you are also keeping many moth species fed too. So many people have said to me that they love butterflies but hate moths. My reply is that to an entemologist there is no difference. They are all scaled, winged insects. Then I ask them if they’ve ever seen some of these beautiful creatures. I have a book full of stunning photos of moths. Burnets have gorgeous markings.There’s one on the chart for the Big Butterfly Count and I’ve posted here a photo of another of our moths, just to give you an idea of how stunning they can be. And they deserve our support. Why not make space for some nectar rich flowers?

Oleander Hawk Moth

Oleander Hawk Moth

Butterflies Everywhere

Comma Butterfly

Comma Butterfly

I am delighted! The last year’s work to install in my garden plants for the butterflies and bees has been so worthwhile. Today I’ve noted many species of bumblebees, honeybees, comma butterflies, gatekeepers, green veined whites, small whites, peacocks and meadow browns. The marjoram is smothered in both bees and butterflies, and the buddleia of course in butterflies (the peacocks especially). Next year will be even better, as I’m busy making more plants to extend the flower beds and I’m saving seed or cuttings of every flower that’s nectar or food for them. I also intend to make bug houses and a bat box. For now I will of course be adding my sightings to the Big Butterfly Count so that better conservation can be achieved. Come on in wildlife! What are you doing to help wildlife? I’d love to know. And if you’ve any tips….please leave them for us all.

Green Veined White Butterfly

Green Veined White Butterfly

Peacock Butterfly

Peacock Butterfly

Gatekeeper Butterfly

Gatekeeper Butterfly